“…While Zionists considered such places as Argentina, Uganda, the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, and Texas, they eventually settled on Palestine for the location of their proposed Jewish State, even though Palestine was already inhabited by a population that was 93-96 percent non-Jewish. The best analysis says the population was 96 percent Muslims and Christians, who owned 99 percent of the land.

…. Numerous Zionist diary entries, letters, and other documents show that they decided to push out these non-Jews – financially, if possible; violently if necessary.”

Editor Comment: The Palestinian plight today could have just as easily been faced by Argentinians, Ugandans, Cypriots or even Texans. These peoples nations are on four different continents. This raises genuine questions about the claim that the former nation of Palestine is being accurately described as ‘The Jewish Promised Land’.

 

Against Our Better Judgment Book Review

A number of books have been written documenting the Zionist control of the U.S. government and how Zionists manipulated world events in order to create Israel. Against Our Better Judgment by Alison Weir is one of the best introductory books ever written on these subjects. The following are some things I learned from reading this book:

allison weir

1) I had never heard of the elitist Zionist secret society called the Parushim, or that Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis was the head of this organization. Brandeis recruited ambitious young men to work for the Zionist cause and further their careers in the process. Brandeis recruited Felix Frankfurter, then a professor at Harvard Law School, as his paid political lobbyist and lieutenant. This highly unethical arrangement allowed Brandeis to keep his considerable political endeavors hidden from the public. Frankfurter used similar methods when he later became a Supreme Court Justice.

Brandeisl
Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis born to Jewish immigrant parents. Brandeis used the law to promotes social change and was instrumental in shaping the Federal Reserve Act and its questionable passage just before Christmas 1913. Most of Congress were absent as they made their way home for Christmas Eve.

2) Against Our Better Judgment documents how Zionists pressured numerous nations in the UN General Assembly into supporting the Zionist partition plan of Israel. For example, Bernard Baruch told France it would lose U.S. aid if it voted against partition. David Niles recruited Harvey Firestone to tell Liberia that Firestone would revoke his planned expansion in Liberia if Liberia voted against partition. Zionist Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter and others pressured the Philippines, while the Latin American delegates were all threatened and bribed into voting yes for the partition. The UN General Assembly Resolution 181 creating partition passed as a result of this intense Zionist pressure.[1]

3) Against Our Better Judgment also has a number of extremely interesting quotes from Jewish authors. For example, Israeli historian Tom Segev states,

“Israel was born of terror, war, and revolution, and its creation required a measure of fanaticism and cruelty.”[2]

Alfred Lilienthal explained in 1953:

“The capture of the American press by Jewish nationalism was, in fact, incredibly complete. Magazines as well as newspapers, in news stories as well as editorial columns, gave primarily the Zionist views of events before, during, and after partition.”[3]

      Against Our Better Judgment has only 93 pages of text and 109 pages of endnotes. Weir’s book is thus succinct and easy to read, while providing extensive documentation and additional material for readers who want to study the subject in more detail. I highly recommend Against Our Better Judgment to anyone interested in how Zionists took over control of the U.S. government and established the nation of Israel.

 

Excerpt from Against Our Better Judgment:

While Zionists considered such places as Argentina, Uganda, the Mediterranean island of Cyprus, and Texas, they eventually settled on Palestine for the location of their proposed Jewish State, even though Palestine was already inhabited by a population that was 93-96 percent non-Jewish. The best analysis says the population was 96 percent Muslims and Christians, who owned 99 percent of the land.

After the Zionist Congress, Vienna’s rabbis sent two of their number to explore Palestine as a possible Jewish state. These rabbis recognized the obstacle that Palestinians presented to the plan, writing home: “The bride is beautiful, but she is married to another man.” Still, Zionists ultimately pushed forward. Numerous Zionist diary entries, letters, and other documents show that they decided to push out these non-Jews – financially, if possible; violently if necessary.

Political Zionism in the U.S.

The importance of the United States to this movement was recognized from early on. One of the founders of political Zionism, Max Nordau, wrote a few years after the Basle conference, “Zionism’s only hope is the Jews of America.”

At that time, however, and for decades after, the large majority of Jewish Americans were not Zionists. In fact, many actively opposed Zionism. In the coming years, however, Zionists were to woo them assiduously with every means at hand and the extent to which Nordau’s hope was eventually realized is indicated by the statement by a prominent author on Jewish history, Naomi Cohen, writing in 2003, “but for the financial support and political pressure of American Jews… Israel might not have been born in 1948.”

Groups advocating the setting up of a Jewish state had first begun popping up around the United States in the 1880s. Emma Lazarus, the poet whose words would adorn the Statue of Liberty, promoted Zionism throughout this decade. A precursor to the Israeli flag was created in Boston in 1891.

In 1887 President Grover Cleveland appointed a Jewish ambassador to Turkey (seat of the Ottoman Empire, which at that time controlled Palestine), because of Palestine’s importance to Zionists. Jewish historian David G. Dalin reports that presidents considered the Turkish embassy important to “the growing number of Zionists within the American Jewish electorate.”

Every president, both Republican and Democrat, followed this precedent for the next 30 years. “During this era, the ambassadorship to Turkey came to be considered a quasi-Jewish domain,” writes Dalin.

 

ENDNOTES

[1] Weir, Allison, Against Our Better Judgment: The Hidden History of How the U.S. Was Used to Create Israel, 2014, pp. 54-57.

[2] Ibid., p. 58.

[3] Ibid., p. 86.

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